Apple iPhone Ruling Consumers, Seventh Straight Year

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Apple iPhone Ruling Consumers, Seventh Straight Year

It seems that there is good time ahead for Apple's iPhone, as it was told that it has managed to get the top spot for the seventh year back to back in the recent J. D. Power smartphone satisfaction survey. With ease of operation and remarkable feature set, Apple's iPhone has been able to garner huge customer base for itself. It managed to get 839 out of a possible 1,000 points, followed by HTC in the second place and Samsung at the third.

The results were based on the date from July through December 2011 concluded that only Apple, HTC and Nokia could raise their bar in terms of customer-satisfaction as compared to the results reported in the last survey.

It was revealed that all those who were having 4G smartphones rated smartphone battery performance at 6.1 out of 10 on average, while those having 3G smartphones marked it at 6.7. Nearly 70% of the smartphone owners have enjoyed some or the other form of social networking on their mobile device, while 21% had complaint of facing software and/or hardware malfunctions.

The survey however revealed that growing dissatisfaction is haunting consumer's likeability and this is what the company must take care to maintain its position in the market.


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