Canadian Government Permits Access to Emergency Stock

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Canadian Government Permits Access to Emergency Stock

It has been uncovered by a new report that shortages currently being faced by provinces and territories in Canada have forced the National Emergency Stockpile System or NESS to allow them an access to its drug stock.

It is being said that the scarcity arisen is the result of production problems that Sandoz Canada Inc., the generic drug maker is facing. As per the findings, the company had made a labeling error in the vials of inject-able morphine last week and has been going through crisis since then.

The report has found that the NESS has been offering varied drugs such as antibiotics, anesthetic agents and morphine to these provinces and territories so that they get able to cover up the shortages.

The NESS is responsible for maintaining limited supplies of some important drugs, aiming to supply these to the provinces during emergency, as told by the Public Health Agency of Canada. However, the Ottawa-housed stockpile is limited and it would be sufficient enough to help 500 patients on ventilators for almost a week, says the report.

"We're taking real action to protect the health and safety of Canadians, whether it's speeding up reviews of replacement drugs or providing access to the NESS", said Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq.


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