New Brunswick Witnesses Whooping Cough Outbreak

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New Brunswick Witnesses Whooping Cough Outbreak

As per Brunswick’s public health office report, it has been revealed that whooping cough pandemic has been increasing with time and number of cases has doubled since February. Dr. Eilish Cleary, who is the province’s Chief Medical Officer, was of the view that they are expecting the number to rise in coming months.

There has been a rise of 100 cases of whooping cough in New Brunswick and still then health authorities are expecting the number to rise even further. “Public Health officials are monitoring the situation closely to ensure that appropriate interventions are in place”, said Cleary.

She further affirmed that they have been closely investigating the matter and are trying to make sure that situation can be made under control. People, who are at risk are children, who are between five and 14, newborns, expecting mothers and elderly and people, who have been already suffering from other disease.

Whooping cough is a highly communicable disease, which occurs due to the presence of the Bordetella Pertussis bacterium in the respiratory tract. Some of its common symptoms are sneezing, running nose, mild fever and things get complicated with passage of time. The Health department has recommended people to take vaccination.

 


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