NASA Video Captures a 'Perpetual Ocean'

.

NASA Video Captures a 'Perpetual Ocean'

In a recent report, it has been confirmed that NASA Scientific Visualization Studio has managed to capture the surface currents of oceans, which can clearly depicts how high tides and low tides occur.

In the name of "Perpetual Ocean", the animation how the globe moves with the movement of oceans which are spread from the Gulf of Mexico to the Indian Ocean to the Black Sea.

From June 2005 through December 2007, it was through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's computational model dubbed as Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean Phase II (ECCO2) that the team could actually simulate the world's oceans and seas' surface flows. The model simply translated satellite and ground-based readings made available into a global, full-ocean depiction of ocean and sea-ice circulation.

It has been further told that ECCO2 is usually used to model global ocean and sea-ice so that a vast knowledge about ocean eddies and other current systems could be derived.

"This visualization was created as a last-minute entry for the SIGGRAPH 2011 computer animation festival; however, it was not accepted”, said the studio, which further confirmed that this video was shot almost a year ago.

It was only after the video was uploaded to NASA Goddard's popular Flickr site that it caught the attention of one and all, as the video was watched by many. This video is told to be some 20 minutes long, but this typically shows what has been hidden from the scientists so far.

While it has always been a mystery how difficult sea travel must have been for many of the explorers who are some or the other way trapped in such oceanic currents, but this video has certainly thrown light on what goes inside the calm surface of oceans.


Latest News

U.S. Labor Secretary Announced Verizon and Unions have Reach an “Agreement in Pr
Different Reports Suggest Jawbone Might be in Trouble
U.S Economy Gaining Steam and Janet Yellen Hints at Interest Rate Increases in C
Hearing Scheduled on June 7 for Lawsuit over Redstone Trust
Scripps National Spelling Bee has co-champs for the third year
Officialsassumed Clinton used personal email for family and friends
Security Researchers Find Connection between Digital Attacks on Asian Banks and
Trump’s Energy Proposals Considered “Frightening” by Environmental Advocates
Brent Oil Climbs to More Than $50 per Barrel
Amazon
Protestors Demanding Minimum Wage Gather at Oak Brook
Toyota Entering Strategic Investment Deal with Uber