Chocolate: An Ideal Thing for Making Stress Run Away

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Chocolate: An Ideal Thing for Making Stress Run Away

Many mothers refuse to give chocolates to their children: here is a report from experts regarding the benefits of chocolates. In this report, experts from all over the world have confirmed the rising health benefits and other positive aspects of chocolate. It's been more than 2000 years now that this mouthwatering food is delighting the taste buds of millions and millions of people.

According to Sunil Kochhar, Ph. D., one of the symposium participants at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS): "Chocolate is one of the foods with the greatest appeal to the general population. The luscious aroma, taste and textures of chocolate have delighted the senses of people in many parts of the world for centuries and make it a well-known comfort food".

Kochhar is working with the Nestle Research Center in Lausanne, Switzerland, since the last so many years and now he has been appreciated for establishing and proving potential health benefits of chocolates.

In one of his studies, based on the biochemical basis for chocolate's repute as a comfort food, he has explained how chocolate tends to reduce the level of anxiety hormones in people. He has revealed that eating an ounce and a half of dark chocolate every day is ideal for reducing emotional anxiety and feeling stressed-out.


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