Common Pesticide Could Be Behind Decline of Honeybees, Bumblebees

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Common Pesticide Could Be Behind Decline of Honeybees, Bumblebees

In a recent report, it has been confirmed that there are fair chances that a common class of pesticide is behind the reducing number of honeybees and bumblebees. It has been bothering one and all about the constant decline of the species.

It was in last week, that a petition was signed by over a million calling for the government to ban the class of pesticides called neonicotinoids. The chemical found in recent researches done is reported to attack the central nervous system of insects, which further pull down the number of queens in bumblebee hives. Not even this, it can make honeybees lose their direction, thereby they even struggle to reach to their hives.

“Where’d they go? We have no clue about that actually”, said study author Mickael Henry, a bee ecologist for the French national agriculture institute.

Published online on Thursday in the journal Science, the research has some or the other way added weight to the previous researches done in the same field, and it would certainly make way for some extended review from the government.

There is need to find out some sort of solution for the same else sooner or later, the species would be hardly seen.


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