Anti-Tobacco Commercials Launched

.

Anti-Tobacco Commercials Launched

Smoking and intake of tobacco have always been considered as a major issue to be tackled across the world. As a part of the anti-tobacco campaign, new commercials have been introduced by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC launched these commercials in Wisconsin, which include the stories of those who used to smoke and were drastically affected by the diseases related to smoking. The diseases mentioned were lung and throat cancer, heart problems, Buerger’s disease and asthma.

Wisconsin has a high number of smokers in the city, with approximately one in five adults into this habit and about 18% high school teens. Statistics show that almost 8,000 people in Wisconsin lose their lives due to this habit every year.

It is being estimated that the tobacco industry spends about $233 million every year to promote their products. The campaign has even been launched to put a fight against the tobacco industry.

As a result, it has been administered that the state’s Tobacco Prevention and Control Program has been able to decline the mortality rate due to smoking.

Marilyn Jenkins of the NW Wisconsin Tobacco Free Coalition said “I hope smokers look at these ads and decide to quit and the young realize that the health consequences are immediate and deadly serious”.


Latest News

U.S. Economic Growth Gets a Boost with New Home Building
Tesla May not Get an Opportunity to Open Stores in Michigan
Cuban role applauded by Kerry in Ebola fight
Travel restrictions can be caused by rising polio cases
Unprotected sex increases in final year of college
Amid Ebola fears in US, newspaper chooses to focus on India's 'health crisis'
Report Given by Nuclear Regulatory says Closure Plan of Yucca Mountain Meets Saf
Google’s Slowing Clicks on Ads Worry Investors and Analysts
Video games can actually help
Aussie’s chest burrowed by Bali spider
No reduction in atrial fibrillation with fish oil, new research finds
Existing protocols might not be enough for Ebola