First Ever Flying Car to Be Seen At Auto Show in New York

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First Ever Flying Car to Be Seen At Auto Show in New York

Can someone imagine that Harry Potter’s flying car could have existed in real life? Be it anything, but truly a flying car exists in actual! Hold your breath to watch the extravaganza at the New York International Auto Show in Manhattan, where this all new invention of flying car would make its debut.

This Monday, it was announced by the manufacturers of the flying car, Woburn-based Terrafugia, that the car successfully completed its first flight. The car which has been dubbed Transition has two seats, four wheels and wings. However, these wings can even be folded so that the car can be even driven on the road.

Till now, the recorded height at which the car flew was 1,400 feet for eight minutes. This is the first success that the inventors have bagged. It was since 1930s, that the American inventors were involved in developing such a car.

Moreover, the material used for developing this car, especially the tires and the glass are very light weight, which help the vehicle to fly.

The company is expecting to start selling the vehicle by next year. The vehicle, which is expected to be cost $279,000, has already witnessed hundreds of people coming up with a deposit of $10,000 to get the brand new invention.


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