New York Times Takes New Avatar for Stating Their Point

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New York Times Takes New Avatar for Stating Their Point

New York Times really does know how to put out forward a point to its readers. Recently, it did a report on hyper addictive casual games. So, in order to make sure a reader gets what that they are trying to say they embedded a game into their article lets players shoot and blow up ads, comments and links on their website.

It’s a bold new move, but considering the fact that the article is seven pages long which incorporates the evolution and implication of these games, NYT surely has hit the bull’s eye with their presentation. The article starts with the much popular game Tetris and moves on to Angry Birds and Farmville which has gripped most of the people.

The author Sam Anderson also goes on to reimburse the times when he himself was a victim of these addictive games stating that even a slight diversion makes a person to get hooked on to them. He goes on to say that for good or for worse, people today are a part of these “stupid games”. This is not the first time NYT has experimented with its layout, despite being termed as the grey lady of journalism.


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