New York Times Takes New Avatar for Stating Their Point

.

New York Times Takes New Avatar for Stating Their Point

New York Times really does know how to put out forward a point to its readers. Recently, it did a report on hyper addictive casual games. So, in order to make sure a reader gets what that they are trying to say they embedded a game into their article lets players shoot and blow up ads, comments and links on their website.

It’s a bold new move, but considering the fact that the article is seven pages long which incorporates the evolution and implication of these games, NYT surely has hit the bull’s eye with their presentation. The article starts with the much popular game Tetris and moves on to Angry Birds and Farmville which has gripped most of the people.

The author Sam Anderson also goes on to reimburse the times when he himself was a victim of these addictive games stating that even a slight diversion makes a person to get hooked on to them. He goes on to say that for good or for worse, people today are a part of these “stupid games”. This is not the first time NYT has experimented with its layout, despite being termed as the grey lady of journalism.


Latest News

Supreme Court upholds lifetime voting ban for convicted felons in Iowa
US District Judge blocks anti-LGBT 'religious freedom' law of Mississippi
Factory Activity in China Slows in June Pushing Further Expectation for Addition
Reportedly Man Driving a Tesla Vehicle Killed in Crash while in Self Driving Mod
Does Brexit Actually Mean a New Sovereign United Kingdom or could it Create a Li
HTC planning to spinoff HTC Vive into independent subsidiary
Google connects US and Japan through undersea cable
CIBC has Agreed to Buy PrivateBancorp in $3.8 Billion Cash and Stock Deal
Former Corinthian Students get some Relief as Education Department Forgives $171
Three crew members missing and one injured after train collision in Texas
Home Prices Gain in the U.S in April with Seven Cities Marking Record High
Although Revised First-Quarter G.D.P. Showed an Upward Move but Still Reflects a