First Ever Device Invented to Help Restore Vision in Blind People

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First Ever Device Invented to Help Restore Vision in Blind People

The new discovery proposed by the Australian scientists regarding the development of a bionic eye will be undergoing a clinical trial by the end of this month.

It has been unveiled that the scientists have been able to successfully produce an alternative for the people who have lost their vision completely; this electronically powered eye will help them restore their sight.

The team of 50 scientists, Monash Vision Group, who introduced for the first time a treatment like this, asserted that during the course of treatment, a microchip will be introduced in the brain.

The patient will have to wear a pair of glasses that will be equipped with a tiny camera and will act as retina. The camera will capture images, as the retina does, these images will be sent in the form of electronic signals to the chip. Moreover, as many as 650 electrodes that will be very thin will be inserted in the visual cortex.

The procedure is expected to allow the patient be able to view images with low resolution and will be black and white.

Dr. Jeanette Pritchard, the Group's General Manager, said: “It's a huge milestone in our technical development”.


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