Why Social Networking Passwords to be Shared with Employers during Interviews?


Why Social Networking Passwords to be Shared with Employers during Interviews?

There were times when the main questions that use to be a part of every interview were: Why do you want the job? Where do you see yourself in five years? And the dreaded: What’s your greatest weakness?

But recently, the interview attending individuals have noticed a drastic change in this trend of question round from the employer’s side. The latest scratchy and surprising question that most of the employers increasingly are asking workers and potential hires these days is: What’s your http://www.facebook.com/Facebook password?

This trend somehow has given birth to criticism towards those innocent employees who have finally filed a petition for a federal inquiry and at least one lawsuit.

However, on Capitol Hill, this issue of disclosing one’s personal Facebook password is being used as a political football among several leaders and employers.

In recent weeks, it has been found that several federal lawmakers have held the hands of the throng that is being involved in the Facebook password incident.

Upon the disclosure of findings of an Associated Press investigation, all of them have been found expressing their anger that how could a private employer even dare to ask a worker about his private or personal email id Password?

Upon further investigation, these federal lawmakers got to know that these employers were belonging from a variety of fields and all of them demanded candidates the passwords of their social networking websites as a condition of employment.

These lawmakers who have joined hands while raising voice against practice are all Democrats. Last week, with an aim to prohibit employers from forcing candidates to disclose their confidential passwords to them, the group of house Democrats made a move against them.

They took out a voting campaign for maintaining the Federal Communications Commission’s ability “to adopt a rule or to amend an existing rule” so that employers could be stopped “from mandating that job applicants or employees disclose confidential passwords to social networking websites”. They name this movement as a “motion to recommit”.

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