FDA Announces Warning for Some Birth Control Pills

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FDA Announces Warning for Some Birth Control Pills

As per recent reports, it has been revealed that FDA has asked the birth pill manufacturers to carry a warning if their drug carries the hormone drospirenone. The warning should contain the message that person taking the pill can develop fatal blood clots.

Some of the many birth control drugs, which will need to carry the warning, are Beyaz, Safyral, Yasmin, and Yaz and Gianvi, Loryna, Ocella and Zarah. The FDA said that the drugs, which carry the hormone, increase the risk of developing blood clots by three times. However, no such risk is present in other drugs, which do not carry the hormone drospirenone.

It has been found that changes in the labeling were proposed at an FDA advisory committee in December 2011, but it is now that the proposal has been passed. It is, however, recommended that women should consult their respective GPs before they start taking any birth control pill.

"Women who use birth control pills with drospirenone (like Yaz) may have a higher risk of getting a blood clot”, read the US Food and Drug Administration website.

Experts were of the view that drospirenone is nothing but a synthetic version of progesterone, a female sex hormone.


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