Video Game to Treat Depression Among Children

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Video Game to Treat Depression Among Children

As per a review, which has been published in the British Medical Journal, it has been revealed that a new computer game has been developed with a special motive. The game has been designed in such a way that it helps the children and young adults to overcome depression.

The researchers at the University of Auckland have assessed the 3D game known as SPARX and have reached at a conclusion that the game is as effective as one to one counseling sessions.

Lead researcher Sally Merry, who is an Associate Professor at the Department of Psychological Medicine, was of the view that they enrolled as many as 94 young adults, who were recently diagnosed with depression. The average age of children, who took part in the experiment were 15.

The game consists of seven challenges which a game player has to play for four to seven weeks. Each game involved different mood, like anger, emotion, and negative feelings. Each player had to clear all the levels.

Sally Merry said that volunteers played game for three months and it was found that the game was as effective as face to face counseling sessions. "The use of the programme resulted in a clinically significant reduction in depression, anxiety and hopelessness, and an improvement in quality of life”, affirmed Merry.

In addition, it has been revealed that 44% children, who successfully played four out of seven challenges, completely recovered. Meanwhile, 26% children, who were in conventional groups recovered.

The children who took part in the experiment liked the game to such an extent that they said that they will recommend all other children about the game. They further affirmed that game is an easy way to receive treatment while having fun. About 80% children appreciated the game.


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