New Invention for People with Hearing Impairments

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New Invention for People with Hearing Impairments

As per recent findings, it has been proposed that soon cochlear implants will be replaced by a tiny middle ear microphone. It has been discovered that US researchers have already produced and also tested such a device.

The research led by University of Utah Engineer Darrin J. Young, has been successfully able to device a microphone, which is attached to the bones of middle ear and uses an accelerometer attached to it for detecting sound sensations.

It is very from different from the previously used device cochlear implants, in which a microphone is to be worn externally and is linked to the auditory nerves via internal stimulator and the functioning of the device involves the transmission of sounds to the nerves through the stimulator, after the microphone feels the vibration of sound.

The device has been used widely across the world to help those who cannot hear but the device has its own drawbacks including expediency, dependability and social perception. The major drawback being that the device is attached externally.

However, the new invention is far much better than the conventional design and has overcome the drawbacks posed by the previous device. The major advantage being the detection of vibration of the eardrum which even occurs in normal hearing.


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