Scientists for the First Time Able To Identify Victim of Black Hole

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Scientists for the First Time Able To Identify Victim of Black Hole

Finally, scientists have been able to put forth evidences, which prove that a black hole swallows star wandering nearby it.

It has been reported that for the first time, scientists have been able to identify the victim of giant black hole. It has been revealed that since a long time it has been into being that black holes have been pulling stars with its strong gravitational pull, and rips them apart, after which a part of it is swallowed by the hole and other one is forced out of the galaxy to some other galaxy by a super massive force.

Scientists have suggested that the massive holes in the center of the galaxy are approximately millions to billions times the sun's mass. They show no action, until a star or other victim wanders near to it. As soon as the object is too close to it, it is shredded by its gravitational pull.

Suvi Gezari, an astronomer at Johns Hopkins University said, “This is the first time we've actually been able to pinpoint what kind of star was disrupted”.

It has been reported that the first incident came into light last year. However, this year they have been able to spot the culprit and well as the stellar victim.


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