Study Unveils Increase in Speed of Glaciers, But Much Lower Than Upper Limits Suggested Before

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Study Unveils Increase in Speed of Glaciers, But Much Lower Than Upper Limits Su

Recent reports have suggested that an increase in speed of Greenland’s glaciers has been encountered, it has been estimated that increase has accounted for 30% in the past 10 years.

A team of researchers from a University of Washington conducted a study, which has termed that the change in the speed is noteworthy, but it is much lower than the level being highlighted in previous studies, which stated that climatic changes have had a drastic affect due to which glaciers are melting.

Moreover, reports from 200 outlet glaciers have emphasized that they have contributed to rise in sea levels, but the contribution is much less than the levels suggested by many of the scientist.

However, it has been asserted by scientists that there are no signs which can prove that the increase in the speed will be stopped during the rest of the century. Moreover, it is being expected that by 2100, the glaciers would contribute to a four inch rise in sea levels.

Twila Moon, a University of Washington Doctoral Student in Earth and Space Sciences and Lead Author said, “The faster the glaciers move, the more ice and melt water they release into the ocean”.

However, it has been discovered that the researchers of the study had less data to prove how major ice regions have responded to climatic changes.


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