Dog and Human Bonding to Be Tested

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Dog and Human Bonding to Be Tested

It has been revealed that a group of researchers from Emory University is going to conduct an experiment, which aims to know the level of understanding of dogs for human signs and language.

In order to reach at the above given conclusion, the study researchers are going to enroll two dogs. They will use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to know which parts of dog brain get activated.

This will help researchers to know whether dogs are able to understand human languages as well as signs showed by them or not. If yes, then the next level of test will be to know, how many languages dogs can understand.

Two dogs that are going to take part in the experiment are Callie, which is a two-year-old Feist and second one is McKenzie. It is a three-year-old Border collie and is already trained by his owner.

Both the dogs have been trained for months, so that they remain completely trained at the time of test. Lead researcher Gregory Berns, who is director of the Emory Center for Neuropolicy, said that this is one of a kind study.

“We hope this opens up a whole new door for understanding canine cognition and inter-species communication. We want to understand the dog-human relationship, from the dog's perspective”, said Berns.


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