Opting E-Health Records Can Be Troublesome For Doctors

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Opting E-Health Records Can Be Troublesome For Doctors

As per recent reports, Health Minister Tanya Plibersek has emphasized that during initial years, after implementation of electron health records, processing will be slow, as it will take time for not only GPs and doctors to cope up with the new reform, but even residents will have to face a few troubles.

Despite an opposition from doctors regarding opting of the system, terming it to be problematic, it has been revealed that the system has called out for people, so as to register them for e-health records, which is subjected to be initiated from July.

Australian Medical Association (AMA) President Steve Hambleton asserted that opting out for e-health records is troublesome for doctors, as they have to again and again check out whether a patient has opted for the record, and if yes, then have they given the full information required to have an access to their personally-controlled electronic health record (PCEHR).

Moreover, it is being termed that in order to track down the patients with PCEHR, doctors will have to spend most of their time in using the system.

However, Ms Plibersek said, "The e-health system has been assisted with benefits, including a reduction in medication mix-ups and less duplication of clinical tests".


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