Olympic Smog May Cause Heart Illness, Say Researchers

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Olympic Smog May Cause Heart Illness, Say Researchers

A team of researchers from the University of Southern California has been warning that air pollution that may be caused by Beijing's 2012 Olympics Smog may prove fatal for many.

It has been found that the study was conducted on the basis of the reports revealed by a previous study. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association had shown that air pollution levels had rebounded after the end of the 2008 Olympics.

As per the findings, a team of researchers researched in the year 2008 so as to find out what effects the changes in air quality have on people's health. The group had taken measurements from 125 medical residents and had noted their blood pressure. It had also tracked some other biomarkers that are related with heart diseases.

The team had then concluded that rise in air pollution may cause rise in risks of blood pressure and blood-clotting factors even in healthy residents.

Junfeng (Jim) Zhang, a study author and a Professor of environmental and global health, said, "If pollution continues, and the burdens of blood-clotting factors are kept at elevated levels, I think there will be adverse consequences long-term".

The study this time has reached to a conclusion that cut in air pollution levels may help in cutting the risk of heart troubles too.


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