BATA Causes More Young People to Smoke: Health Minister

.

BATA Causes More Young People to Smoke: Health Minister

BATA (British American Tobacco Australia) is being charged of targeting more number of vulnerable teenagers by the federal government, says a new report.

As per the reports, it has been unfolded that the introduction of a new brand namely Just Smokes at cheaper prices by the group has resulted in increased number of smokers. While the average price of cigarettes is $16, the group is selling the new pack of 25 cigarettes at a mere cost of $11.50.

Tanya Plibersek, Health Minister, said in the context that the move made by BATA is highly unacceptable as it is fulfilling the needs of teenagers. Young adults are found to be price sensitive and their incidence of smoking is increasing as a result of low prices.

However, the group disagreed with all the comments and affirmed that it was propelled to introduce a fall in prices. It said that the same is being done as a consequence of increase of 25% in tobacco excise by the government in 2010.

But, health minister boldly opposes the same and says, "We'll keep looking at what we need to do to continue to reduce the rates of people smoking in Australia".


Latest News

Factory Activity in China Slows in June Pushing Further Expectation for Addition
Reportedly Man Driving a Tesla Vehicle Killed in Crash while in Self Driving Mod
Does Brexit Actually Mean a New Sovereign United Kingdom or could it Create a Li
HTC planning to spinoff HTC Vive into independent subsidiary
Google connects US and Japan through undersea cable
CIBC has Agreed to Buy PrivateBancorp in $3.8 Billion Cash and Stock Deal
Former Corinthian Students get some Relief as Education Department Forgives $171
Three crew members missing and one injured after train collision in Texas
Home Prices Gain in the U.S in April with Seven Cities Marking Record High
Although Revised First-Quarter G.D.P. Showed an Upward Move but Still Reflects a
A Story of Cooperation Turned Sour; Airbnb Sues San Francisco over New Rules
Researchers says dogs might help detect hypoglycemia in diabetes patients