Video Games to Act as Therapies for Stroke Patients

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Video Games to Act as Therapies for Stroke Patients

As per reports, it has been revealed that a group of researchers from the Newcastle University has teamed up with a video game studio, Circus Challenge, to help stroke patients to regain movements in arms and wrists.

Janet Eyre, who is professor of Paediatric Neuroscience at the university, was of the view that in the UK, 150,000 people in the UK suffers a stroke every year, which means that after every five minutes a Briton suffers from a stroke.

Stroke weakens arms and wrist, which restricts movement and make a person dependent on others to carry out daily tasks. In order to treat the affected parts, regular therapies are needed and that for a long time.

The video games have been designed in such a way that stroke patients will continue playing games like lion taming, juggling and trampolining that they will get engrossed in playing and will forget that it was a part of therapy.

“With our video game, people get engrossed in the competition and action of the circus characters and forget that the purpose of the game is for therapy”, said Eyre. In order to design the game, £1.5million has been provided as fund by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund.


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