Coffee Intake May Reduce Death Risk

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Coffee Intake May Reduce Death Risk

As per a research, which has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, it has been revealed that coffee lovers will be able to live longer than their counter parts who abstain from having it.

The study findings were made after assessing the health of more than 400,000 older adults for 14 years. All these people were die-hard coffee lovers and comparison was done with people who refrain from coffee.

Lead researcher Neal Freedman, who is an epidemiologist with the National Cancer Institute, was of the view that the research has confirmed one thing that coffee is not harmful.

He further affirmed that people, who cannot live without having four to five cups of coffee, are at lower risk of death than their counterparts, who do not even like the brew. Neal said that it is one of the rarest studies, which has said that coffee is healthy for body, as otherwise maximum studies have concluded that coffee is not at all healthy. "The results offer some reassurance that it's not a risk factor for future disease”, he further affirmed.

The effect of coffee among women was greater than in men. It has been found that caffeine decreased chances of getting diagnosed with illnesses.


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