Body Pain Can Be Controlled Through Diverting the Mind

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Body Pain Can Be Controlled Through Diverting the Mind

It has been recently revealed in a research that when the mind is distracted, it might even put a hold on the pain signals coming to the body. This means that in the time to come, simply diverting the mind would be a good way to help the patents who are suffering from immense pain during treatments.

This study was conducted recently and is of the view that the mind actually stops reacting towards pain after a while, and the nervous system doesn’t react towards the pain.

The research has been done by a team from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and they were of the view that this might be an ideal way of helping patients suffering a lot of pan in the time to come. It would mean that now the patients won’t have to suffer while and after major treatments and surgeries.

"The results demonstrate that this phenomenon is not just a psychological phenomenon, but an active neuronal mechanism reducing the amount of pain signals ascending from the spinal cord to higher-order brain regions”, said lead author Christian Sprenger

It remains to be seen how this study might prove to be helpful for the patients in the future and how it shall aid the better treatment for them.


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