Superflares on Sun-Like Stars Grasp Scientists’ Attention

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Superflares on Sun-Like Stars Grasp Scientists’ Attention

A recent report indicated how superflares attracted the attention of scientists, who managed to spot some 365 superflares coming from 148 sun-like stars. It was done with the help of Kepler satellite. It is yet to be unveiled why such flares occur on stars.

It is believed by Mike Hapgood, a space weather scientist at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford, England, that such bright flashes are some or the other way linked with a coronal mass ejection. It is believed that it can cause a lot of damage to Earth and that’s what has caught the interest of scientists so that a lot more is being explored about the same.

It is believed that so far, the biggest flare on Earth was noted some 450 years back and is known as the 1859 Carrington event, which had affected the telegraph at that time. However, such flares on sun-like stars can prove out to be a lot severe. It has even been asserted by Bradley Schaefer of Louisiana State University that such flares on stars can be as much as 10 million times brighter than the event seen earlier on Earth.

There is a lot to be studied in the same context in the time to come so that the reason behind the same can be made known.


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