Asteroids Pose Risk of Collision with Earth

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Asteroids Pose Risk of Collision with Earth

As per a new research being taken out by a group of scientists from NASA, it has been revealed that asteroids pose a risk of collision with the Earth. It has also been revealed that they asteroids are twice more risky than being thought by NASA officials.

It has been found that there are 4,700 potentially hazardous asteroids (PHA’s). In addition, there are about 1,500 space rocks, which are quite wide, and orbits in such a motion that they get quite close to the Earth. Sometimes they get so close that fear of collision occurs.

Amy Mainzer, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, explained that asteroids are quite big and have capacity to do great damage to the Earth. The study findings were based on the observations from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), which is an infrared space telescope.

In addition, it has been found that there are many asteroids, which are closely aligned to the Erath and are in the same pattern as the Sun is to the Earth. "A possible explanation is that many of the PHAs may have originated from a collision between two asteroids in the main belt lying between Mars and Jupiter”, explained NASA officials.


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