Australia Gives $16 million To Help SA in Crisis

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Australia Gives $16 million To Help SA in Crisis

As per reports, it has been revealed that Australia has come forward to help South Africa as it has hard hit by two famines. Australia has given an extra $16 million to South Africa, so it can arrange food and medical assistance.

Foreign Minister Bob Carr has confirmed the news and was of the view that they will help people living in West Africa and South Sudan to arrange for necessary things being needed at the time of crisis. Official reports have revealed that there are more than 16 million people, who need assistance in Sahel region of West Africa.

Not only this, as it has also been found that one million people in the region have been suffering from malnutrition. A lot many children can lose their life, if they are not provided with supplements that can improve their condition.

Senator Carr said that they have divided the money in such a way that it will provide a aid package for cereals, pulses and oils as well as for medical facilities, health screening. The money also covers the training cost for local medical staff, so they are able to handle situation in time of crisis.

WFP West Africa Spokesperson Malik Triki said that they need at least $790 million to complete this operation and are still running out of money.


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