Gene to Act as Reversible Contraceptive

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Gene to Act as Reversible Contraceptive

As per a research, which has been published in the PLos Genetics, it has been revealed that a group of researchers from Edinburgh has identified a gene, known as Katnal1, which can be used as reversible contraceptive.

In reality, the gene was said to be quite a vital tool in developing the sperm, but it has been recently revealed that the gene can also be used as a reversible contraceptive. Researchers at the Centre for Reproductive Health at the University of Edinburgh said they were trying to find out a reason for male fertility.

While finding a reason, they changed the genetic code of mice to check the cause of infertility. After completing the process, they found a protein, which is vital for the development of sperm and if it is not there or is present in less amount then it will cause infertility among men.

For now, they have conducting the experiment in mice and are hoping that the same thing will also be applicable in humans and that without any lasting damage.

Dr. Lee Smith, who was also involved in the research, said, "The important thing is that the effects of such a drug would be reversible because Katnal1 only affects sperm cells in the later stages of development”.


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