Children Choose Gadgets as per Choice

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Children Choose Gadgets as per Choice

As per a research, which has been published in the Journal Nature, it has been revealed that children as young as seven months are sensible enough to choose such toys and gadgets which are simple and interesting to play.

Lead author Celeste Kidd from the University of Rochester was of the view that that the infants are intelligent to ignore complex toys and gadgets. During their study, researchers noticed the development of intuitive sense among babies.

This sense helps them to select only those things, which are beneficial for them as well and not too complex to be learned. In order to reach at the above result, the study researchers checked the attention patterns of 72 babies, who were aged between seven and eight months.

All babies were shown video animations of fun items and by using the eye tracking device, they watched gaze movement of babies. Till the time babies watched the video, the trial was continued, but as soon as babies took away their eyes from the screen, the trail was stopped.

Then the studied the recorded eye movement patterns and found that babies were paying attention to only such videos, which they found to be useful for them.

"The study suggests that babies are not only attracted by what is happening but they are able to predict what happens next based on what they have already observed”, said Kidd.


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