Court Releases GP Entangled in Patients’ Deaths Case

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Court Releases GP Entangled in Patients’ Deaths Case

In a shocking revelation, the doctor who was earlier charged of medical negligence, resulting in the death of two patients, has been given a green signal. It was shocking to see Rejendra Kokkarne moving out free from Leeds Crown Court, even after knowing that he had prescribed high doses of a painkiller to two of his patients while he was busy checking his emails and cricket scores.

It was told that the two patients Beryl Barber, 78, and Eric Watson, 86, had died after they were given morphine sulphate recommended by Dr. Kokkarne. The doctor is reported to have shared the dose with a nurse at the Charlton Centre for Alzheimer's and Dementia Care in Batley, West Yorkshire, through phone. Had the doctor understood the severity of the call made by the nurse, the patients would have been alive. But, overlooking the details about the patients’ condition, the doctor ordered the nurse 10 times excessive dose of the painkiller which ultimately triggered the death of the two innocent souls.

While it was believed that the dose was lethal enough to kill anyone and the doctor must be suitably punished for the gross fallacy, it was shocking that the court cleared him of all charges.


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