Study Claims Vigorous Exercise as Harmful For Body as Drugs; May Cause Heart Attack

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Study Claims Vigorous Exercise as Harmful For Body as Drugs; May Cause Heart Att

It has been long since experts suggest that exercising daily can keep a person fit and prevent major health ailments, including heart disease, blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Rather, they urge people to exercise regularly.

However, the findings in this study have added on a twist to the story. It has been claimed that vigorous exercise is as harmful for the body as drugs.

The researchers of the study suggest that instead of running heavily for hours, it is better to walk or jog for 30 to 60 minutes. Exceeding from this time limit will lead to devastating results.

It has been notified that running or exercising forcefully for hours could lead to structural changes to heart, which could further result in heart attacks.

Dr. James O'Keefe, of St Luke's Hospital in Kansas City, who reviewed previous research, said: "Physical exercise, though not a drug, possesses many traits of a powerful pharmacological agent. However, as with any pharmacological agent, a safe upper dose limits potentially exists, beyond which the adverse effects of physical exercise may outweigh its benefits”.

However, he assured that most of the people working out daily to remain fit or restrain their obesity are not under threat; it is majorly the athletes, who run marathons, triathlons and compete in long-distance bicycle races, who are at risk.


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