Dog Catches Hendra Virus in north Queensland

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Dog Catches Hendra Virus in north Queensland

As per reports, it has been revealed that a dog from a property at Ingham, in north Queensland, has been tested positive for the Hendra virus. Owners of the dog have also been tested, and has been said to be at a lower risk of contracting eth disease.

Chief Veterinary Officer Rick Symons was learnt having said that they will have to retest the dog, as one of four blood samples have come out to be positive. They need to ensure that whether there is a need to euthanize the dog or not.

He further affirmed that it is not the first case in which hendra virus has happened to other species. “While laboratory research has been conducted on dogs, there has only been one other recorded case of a dog being infected with Hendra virus”, said Agriculture Minister John McVeigh.

The first dog, which contracted Hendra virus was two-year-old kelpie Dusty and had to be euthanized on a property at Mount Alford.

There are very few chances that owner of dog will suffer from the disease, but they will ask to go through all the tests to ensure that they are safe. McVeigh said that since 2011, sixteen horses and one dog has been euthanized.


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