Ketamine Benefits Depression Patients, says Study

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Ketamine Benefits Depression Patients, says Study

As per an Australian study, it has been revealed that recreational drug known as Ketamine has been providing relief to the people who have been from suffering from mild to severe form of depression.

A group of researchers from the University of NSW has said that it is a quite common anesthetic, which starts showing its effect from within hours to a day after use. Lead researcher Prof Colleen Loo of University of NSW informed that the drug is given intravenously to people.

The study researchers have already conducted a trial on a handful of Australian people and all have been able to derive the benefits. Loo said that their clinical trial has not ended and they will be enrolling 40 more patients for it.

In the new clinical trial, they will be dividing the total number into two groups. The first group will be asked to take Ketamine and the second group will be asked to take a placebo. Loo revealed that the drug is also in use in Australia for anesthesia, sedation, and pain relief.

The main aim of their research is to check its efficacy and safety. "Ketamine reverses those kinds of changes. It's promoting the growth of new nerve projections and new synapses between nerve cells", said Loo.


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