Geoengineering Projects May Reduce Rainfall

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Geoengineering Projects May Reduce Rainfall

There is no doubt that rapid industrialization is going to affect the global environment some or the other way and that’s what has prompted researchers around the world to address the underlying causes. On the same lines, a team of researchers from European countries has made it clear that engineering projects developed on large scale can significantly reduce the rainfall in Europe and North America.

"Climate engineering cannot be seen as a substitute for a policy pathway of mitigating climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions”, said the team, which published the research in Earth System Dynamics, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union. The claim was made after the team applied four different computer models to understand the impact of increased carbon dioxide on earth’s climate. It was found by the team that rainfall reduced by as much as 5%, thereby making it all the more difficult for such projects to become a reality in the time to come.

While there is long running debate on the viability of geoengineering projects which more or less are on papers, it is believed that such projects can actually hamper the climatic factors. No matter, what the proponents of the same claim, they have always got stern response from environmentalists who strongly believe that such projects are acting more like a distraction in the aim of reducing carbon emissions.


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