Research Unveils How Cockroaches Disappear So Quickly

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Research Unveils How Cockroaches Disappear So Quickly

In a recent report, it has been confirmed that there is a development of a robot which has the capacity to imitate cockroaches and geckos might be able to support in the development of search-and-rescue droids.

It has been claimed by a team of researchers led by Robert Full, an integrative biologist at the University of California at Berkeley. The robot in the name of DASH (Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod) is confirmed to have six legs and is totally based on the movement of cockroaches and geckos.

"After close inspection of the video, we saw that the cockroach was using its legs as grappling hooks by engaging its claws at the tip of the ledge”, he said, who along with his colleagues observed a cockroach with high-speed video cameras. It was done to observe how they cross gaps while they were running at high speeds. The study, published this week on PLOS One, has revealed a lot about how cockroaches manage to run so fast between the gaps too.

There is no doubt that nature has a lot to offer and that’s what makes scientists to keep looking at the strength of the nature which might able to develop many more things.


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