PET Scans Might Be Used To Diagnose Cancer

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PET Scans Might Be Used To Diagnose Cancer

Efforts made by a team of researchers at University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Research Institute have finally shown worth. It has been reported that the team has developed a new method to obtain more accurate results from PET scans of lab rats. Using these scans, movements of the rodents can be tracked and taken into consideration.

The research accomplished by the team has been published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface. One of the researchers, Andre Kyme said, "The method we're using involves tracking the head motion while the animal is being imaged and then accounting for that motion".

Andre Kyme, who did this research under supervision of Associate Professor Roger Fulton, while pursuing his PhD stated that with this method, scanning of the rodent can be performed, even while it is awake and moving.

He explained that during the study, they injected radioactive tracer molecules into the rodents and when these animals were placed under scanner, these molecules emitted light, which helps to administer process going on inside the body.

He further suggested that such positron emission tomography (PET) scans can be used by doctors in order to examine cancer patients. It will majorly help them acknowledge the advancement of the disease and also the accurate treatments for the patient.


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