PET Scans Might Be Used To Diagnose Cancer

.

PET Scans Might Be Used To Diagnose Cancer

Efforts made by a team of researchers at University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Research Institute have finally shown worth. It has been reported that the team has developed a new method to obtain more accurate results from PET scans of lab rats. Using these scans, movements of the rodents can be tracked and taken into consideration.

The research accomplished by the team has been published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface. One of the researchers, Andre Kyme said, "The method we're using involves tracking the head motion while the animal is being imaged and then accounting for that motion".

Andre Kyme, who did this research under supervision of Associate Professor Roger Fulton, while pursuing his PhD stated that with this method, scanning of the rodent can be performed, even while it is awake and moving.

He explained that during the study, they injected radioactive tracer molecules into the rodents and when these animals were placed under scanner, these molecules emitted light, which helps to administer process going on inside the body.

He further suggested that such positron emission tomography (PET) scans can be used by doctors in order to examine cancer patients. It will majorly help them acknowledge the advancement of the disease and also the accurate treatments for the patient.


Latest News

Groundbreaking operation experienced by Vicky the orangutan
Sleep positions say a lot about your relationship
Pet cat gives meningitis to kid
Bar set higher for foreign doctors to work in England
Nose can be a pathfinder
NPD: Xbox One and PS4 sales have surpassed 5 million and 7 million units respect
Nissan expands "No Charge to Charge" promotion, offers new EZ-Charge cards to Le
Dropbox acquires two startups --- Loom and Hackpad
Alex Springer CEO Mathias Dopfner strongly criticizes Google in open letter
NWS issues flood warnings around Maine rivers
Microsoft launches All-in-One Media Keyboard
Bigwig tech companies and wireless carriers back anti-theft tools agreement