NASA Locates New Moon around Pluto

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NASA Locates New Moon around Pluto

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a new moon around Pluto. The revelation has brought the total number of moons around Pluto to five. It is the same instrument, which detected other two moons around Pluto, which were being named as Nix and Hydra.

In addition, Hubble Space Telescope is also keeping a tab at P5, which is considered to deform at any time. The International Astronomical Union said that it seems one day P4 and P5 will be able to meet their requirements, and accordingly they will be named as celestial bodies.

Some say, P5 mimics Moon, but experts are of the view that there is nothing of such sort, as P5 is just a big mass, which has rounded due to its own gravity pull and otherwise, it would have been a mass, which has been in a irregularly shape.

Experts said that they if they have to describe P5 then they would like to say that it is the smallest known satellite of Pluto. Alan Stern, who is the chief investigator and is, working with Southwest Research Institute, said that they are quite concerned as they have been discovering more and more moons around Pluto, which is crowding Pluto.


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