Barge Mansions Enterprise at Intrepid Sea Museum

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Barge Mansions Enterprise at Intrepid Sea Museum

NASA’s space shuttle Enterprise has got a new residence for itself, reaching the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City on Thursday, a recent report has found.

Though the shuttle has never gone for a space journey, it is well known for its long 30-year history. Since, it has performed a massive number of tests in 1977 near the Earth's atmosphere.

It has been found that the first space shuttle was however launched as a test vehicle for checking the ability of a craft to fly. But, introduced in 1976, the spacecraft proved to be an opening pathway for five shuttles to commute to space.

“The Enterprise allows us to really offer such a beauty and such a piece of NASA history to a region that never really had something like this before”, sources say.

The space shuttle was initially left for flying to New York in April aboard a 7-47 jumbo jet, says the report. But, travelling over the Manhattan skyline along with the Statue of Liberty, while amusing people and making its way to John F. Kennedy's International Airport, it ultimately was landed by barge to the museum.

Enterprise now is at display suspended above the World War Two-era aircraft carrier’s deck, allowing visitors to walk underneath it as well.


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