Straight Glass Reduces Speed of Drink Intake, Says Study

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Straight Glass Reduces Speed of Drink Intake, Says Study

The pace of drinking matters a lot on the shape of a glass, says a research being published in the journal PLoS ONE. The study being taken out by a group of researchers from School of Experimental Psychology, Bristol, has uncovered through their study that people drink alcohol at a fast speed when it is being served in a curved glass.

Their speed reduces when the same amount of alcohol is being served in a straight glass. Lead researcher Dr. Angela Attwood, who is a researcher at the School of Experimental Psychology, was of the view that drinking time is slowed by nearly 60% when a person drinks from a straight glass than from a curved glass.

In order to prove their hypothesis, the study researchers conducted a study, which included 159 social drinkers. Average age of people, who took part in the research, was between 18 and 40 years.

Analysis of the study revealed that it took 11 minutes to finish 12oz of beer from a straight glass. On the other hand, it took just seven minutes to drink the same amount from a curved glass. The study findings can prove to be quite beneficial at the time when it comes to control alcohol intake.

 


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