Baby Boomers Facing Chronic Illnesses, Says Study

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Baby Boomers Facing Chronic Illnesses, Says Study

A recent study has found that babies born during the end of second world war have higher rates of chronic illness like asthma and type-2 diabetes. The study was conducted by researchers of three universities of Adelaide.

Professor Graeme Hugo from Adelaide University said that the findings are alarming. He said, "We have to do something now.. but I think more importantly if baby boomers are going to be able to lead active and productive lives in their later years". The rates of obesity among them is also said to be high. Previous studies have linked obesity with life threatening diseases.

The researchers have asked the health authorities to draft new policies so that baby boomers could be supported in leading active life. The findings were released on Thursday. It is hoped that the health experts will take a serious note of the findings.

Huge investments will be required to be made so that increased rates of obesity and chronic illness could be put under control. The health authorities have not yet commented upon the findings. The priority of the authorities should be to reduce the rates of obesity as obesity can lead to life threatening diseases like cancer and heart stroke.


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