Harvard study: Caffeinated coffee can increase risk of exfoliation glaucoma

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Harvard study: Caffeinated coffee can increase risk of exfoliation glaucoma

According to the findings of a new study carried out by the researchers at the Harvard University, people who consume three or more cups of caffeinated coffee a day face an increased risk of vision problems, including glaucoma and vision loss.

With the study - published on October 3, in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science – alerting dedicated coffee drinkers about higher vision-loss risk linked to excessive consumption of the beverage, the researchers highlighted that the chances of developing the ‘exfoliation glaucoma’ condition could be as much as 66 percent more in men and women who drink three or more cups of caffeinated coffee every day.

Given the fact that exfoliation glaucoma is a rare eye disorder which affects nearly 10 percent of 50-plus adults and can cause vision loss or blindness, the study pointed out that the glaucoma risk was highest in women who have a family history of the condition.

With other caffeinated foods – such as tea and chocolate – not showing the same link to exfoliation glaucoma, the Glaucoma Research Foundation also revealed that the rare eye condition is more common in people of Scandinavian origin.

Substantiating the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s observation, the study’s author Jae Hee Kang - from Women's Hospital in Boston – said that Scandinavian populations have “the highest frequencies of exfoliation syndrome and glaucoma” because they also have “the highest consumption of caffeinated coffee in the world.”

 


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