Apple retail stores adopt new ‘wet iPhone replacement’ policy

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Apple

According to a new 'wet iPhone replacement' policy adopted by Apple retail stores, the moisture-damaged iPhone will be replaced at a less charge, as compared to the earlier situation whereby the customers had to pay a full price for getting the iPhones replaced along with having to extend their AT&T contracts.

As per the new offer, Apple would now replace the moisture-wrecked iPhones with revamped ones at a cost of $199; that too without a contract extension. However, if refurbished iPhones are not available, customers may be given a new iPhone as a replacement.

The new replacement policy is a welcome move since iPhone is supposed to be 'supersensitive' to sweat and steam, which often causes frustration among its users. The popular smartphone can often stop working, either due to the perspiration resulting from a vigorous workout or even the moisture from the shower.

With the change in Apple's replacement policy, customers with water-ruined iPhones simply need to walk up to the App Store to get a $199 refurbished iPhone replacement, though of the same generation iPhone model that they give for replacement. In case customers want to upgrade from a 2G to 3G iPhone during the replacement process, they would obviously need to upgrade their contract to the higher cost 3G data plan.


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