Dolphins can remain awake for 15 days

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Dolphins can remain awake for 15 days

In a recently published research, it has been revealed that dolphins can stay awake for as many as 15 days. The study, which has been published in the journal PLoS One, has unveiled some startling revelations about the dolphin.

It has been found that dolphins can not only stay for so many days, but can also perform all the tasks using echolocation with nearly 100% perfection. Moreover, it has been found that dolphins half of the brain sleeps at a time and other works.

In order to reach at the above given result, the study researchers carried out an experiment on one female and one male dolphin. Lead researcher Brian Branstetter from the National Marine Mammal Foundation was of the view that their experiment continued for 15 days and during that time, they did not notice any sort of fatigue in the pair of dolphins.

"The demands of ocean life on air breathing dolphins have led to incredible capabilities, one of which is the ability to continuously, perhaps indefinitely, maintain vigilant behavior through echolocation", said Branstetter.

As said, one of the key ways to remain awake for so long is to allow one part of the brain to shut down.


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