Obstetricians and Gynecologists Suggest Oral Contraceptives without Prescription

.

Obstetricians and Gynecologists Suggest Oral Contraceptives without Prescription

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has recommended that women should be given oral contraceptives over the counter even if they are not prescribed the same. The aim is to cut the number of unwanted pregnancies in the United States.

A recent report states that in case the suggestion is taken into consideration, women would probably be able to get birth control pills along with ibuprofen and cough drops down the road.

It is being said that the rate of unplanned pregnancies has remained the same over the past two decades. 50% of all pregnancies are unintended and the reason behind the same is either difficulty in access to birth control pills or costs related to the same.

Thus only, as per the findings, the group of gynecologists has been suggesting the availability of the pills without a prescription. Canada and most of the Europe as well as many other developed nations are until date requiring a prescription before getting oral contraceptives, which needs to be ended to end unwanted pregnancies.

"I want it between the condoms and pregnancy test kits. I want it there so it's giving the message: if you're sexually active, use protection", president and CEO of the Reproductive Health Technologies Project, Kirsten Moore, was quoted as saying.

 


Latest News

QEP Pipeline Assets Bought by Tesoro in a $2.5 Billion Deal
Adidas’s Reebok to Get a $2.2 billion Bid from Investors
Survey Reveals Slow Wage Increases in the U.S
Eurozone’s Low Performance Draw Mixed Reactions
Too much coffee affects fertility among men
Graphic WA Heart Foundation LiveLighter campaign targets obesity
Now, a device that will improve vision
Change in gene can cause depression and ageing
U.S. Economic Growth Gets a Boost with New Home Building
Tesla May not Get an Opportunity to Open Stores in Michigan
Cuban role applauded by Kerry in Ebola fight
Travel restrictions can be caused by rising polio cases