Porsche Unveils Cayman 2013 at 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show

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Porsche Unveils Cayman 2013 at 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show

Podium of 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show was effectively been used by sports car maker Porsche. They used the platform to unveil the new 2013 Cayman, which is said to provide a complete new experience.

The company promises that the new version will not only be longer and faster, but it will also be lighter and lower. While talking more about the car prime points, Porsche said that they have worked on efficacy and power of the car and were happy to announce that people will surely like their improvements.

The new model of Cayman is lighter by 30 kg in comparison to the new model. Not only this, it has been found that that its energy efficient as well as it uses 15% less fuel per 100pm. Porsche said that they have kept three things in mind while developing the new model of Cayman and those three points were low weight, great in style and high engine output.

It has been found that customers will be provided with two gear options to choose from. They can either choose a standard six-speed manual or they can go for seven-speed dual-clutch unit. It is up to them which gear box they prefer, but both are unique at their end.


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