Mistletoe’s Fraxini Powerful Enough to Fight Colon Cancer

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Mistletoe’s Fraxini Powerful Enough to Fight Colon Cancer

Mistletoe would be likely bought by many as the occasion of Christmas is ahead. It is being said by a team of researchers that the plant used to celebrate the festival has proved promising as a treatment for colon cancer.

This particular form of cancer is known as a second leading cause of deaths related to cancers in the western areas. In Australia, some 80 people die of the same each year. Therefore, say experts, it is highly essential to address the disease sooner as possible.

A study was conducted by the team from the University of Adelaide, which involved testing of fraxini, a type of mistletoe. It was found that the plants had more potential in curing the colon cancer as compared to chemotherapy.

It is being said that though distinct kinds of extracts of mistletoe are in use in varied European countries. But, Australia is new to the same. The fraxini plant has a protein that can kill rapidly dividing cancer cells. And during the same, it remains soothing on intestinal cells.

"This might mean that Fraxini is a potential candidate for increased toxicity against cancer, while also reducing potential side effects", said Zahra Lotfollahi, a health sciences honors student.


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