Hundreds of Dead Squid Gather on California Beach


Hundreds of Dead Squid Gather on California Beach

Reports have shed light over a fact that in recent past days, dead squid in hundreds stacked on a California beach. Also, it is not by accident, rather they have been stranding themselves in anger of suicide and are being found on the Santa Cruz beaches.

Though, researchers have observed their thoughts of committing suicide in fury. They have been unable to trace the reason behind this kind of behavior in squid. They only say that it is weird to see them taking their own lives.

"It can make people a little uncomfortable. With a squid that big, it's nothing to scoff at, but there has been no documentation of them trying to eat a human", Ms. Rosen was quoted by sources.

As per the findings, the dead squid is Humboldt squid, which has taken its named from the Humboldt Current, as they live there off the South America coast. It has been told that the squid can be seen in the eastern Pacific down from 660 to 2,300 feet.

However, these creatures seem moving northward; the researchers are of the opinion that this is a possible result of warming oceans.

It is being estimated that the quid might be failing to understand what is happening around them and thus, might be stranding themselves.


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