US Court Enters into Consent Decree and Permanently bans Sunland

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US Court Enters into Consent Decree and Permanently bans Sunland

After confirming that Sunland Inc., producer of peanut butter, was having a strain of Salmonella Bredeney in its products, their products have been banned permanently.

U. S. District Court Judge William P. Johnson has signed a consensual decree of permanent ban against the company as well as against Jimmie D. Shearer, who is the chief executive of the company.

The Justice Department said that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carried out an investigation in the company of the defendant and found the samples to be having strain of salmonella. The FDA then requested the Justice Department to ask the court to enter into a consent decree and they acted accordingly.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that as many as 35 people in 19 states have suffered an infection of Salmonella Bredeney. Infection was so severe in eight cases that they were hospitalized for the same.

Investigations were carried out, and the CDC and the FDA found Sunland to be the prime suspect. The FDA said that they then carried out an individual investigation at defendants' facility from Sept 9 to Oct 16, 2012. They found certain Sunland products having strain of Salmonella Bredeney. It was then that the decision was taken.

 


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