Five Biggest Stories of Twitter’s 2012 Journey

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Five Biggest Stories of Titter’s 2012 Journey

2012 is heading towards its end and so this news brings the five biggest stories of 2012 on Twitter, which proves it to be forming an integral part of everyone's everyday life.

In 2012, micro-blogging service became truly mainstream because:

  1. It served as a vital tool during catastrophes: During the disaster, there were more than 20 million storm-related tweets sent.
  2. It was used as the most appropriate medium by the presidential candidates, which set it at the center of political turmoil around the world as it efficiently served as the best tool to all those people, who never wanted to miss any of the leads over the race for the White House.
  3. Several business battles were witnessed on Twitter like the one occurred between it and Instagram, which finally ramped up slowly over the course of the year. Yes, Twitter and Instagram became big rivals in 2012 especially when Twitter started launching several of its new tools that made it more like Instagram.
  4. It shared the moments of an election victory and the successful Olympics.
  5. Also, it helped the lonely fire department dispatcher sitting in a room let the waterlogged New Yorkers know that the help was on the way.

 


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