NYU Langone Medical Center reopens for surgery

.

NYU Langone Medical Center reopens for surgery

After remaining closed for around two months, the inpatient services and surgical units of the New York-base NYU Langone Medical Center have once again become operational.

The NYU Langone Medical Center had closed the inpatient facilities after Superstorm Sandy caused severe damages to the facilities. Estimates suggest that the facilities sustained damages that could surpass $1 billion.

At the peak of the second-costliest hurricane in U. S. history, Medical Center was forced to evacuate more than 320 patients, including twenty babies in intensive care unit (ICU), as it lost power and its back-up generators shut down after water crept into their fuel tanks.

On Thursday, more than fifty inpatients were being seen at the facilities, a spokesperson for the hospital confirmed. The spokesperson added that the facilities were once again ready to perform surgeries on patients that would involve overnight stays.

The Manhattan hospital's emergency department could remain closed until the end of next year.

The hurricane had also damaged many other hospitals in Manhattan. Bellevue Hospital Center, the city's leading trauma treatment center and one of the country's oldest hospitals, was one of those badly damaged hospitals.

 


Latest News

Depending on Regulatory Approvals, Ferrari CEO Expects to Conclude IPO, Spin- of
Facebook’s Revenues Surpass Expectations
Fed Has Bright View of a Strengthening U.S Economy But Will be ‘Patient’ with In
Don Thompson  to Retire From the Post of  McDonald’s chief executive
Consumers Confidence Grows but Businesses are Worried
CEO says The Present Year is one of Transition for AT&T Inc.
The Federal Reserve Meets for two Days: Likely to Stick to Initial Plans of Incr
New Areas to be Opened Off the East Coast for Oil Exploration
Even with Low Inflation the Feds are Expected to Raise Interest Rates
Mattel Missed Analyst’s Expectation, Fires CEO
Reports of Mass Layoffs Flatly Denied by IBM
Good News for the Diabetic: FDA Approved Mobile Medical Application for Sharing