Hospital Releases Peter Ndlovu, Recovery at Home Now

.

Hospital Releases Peter Ndlovu, Recovery at Home Now

Peter “Nsukuzonke” Ndlovu, who is a former professional footballer for Zimbabwe, has got official discharge from hospital, a recent report has uncovered. The international soccer legend has now been recovering in Bulawayo at his own home.

Yesterday afternoon, Mater Dei Hospital released him from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) saying that his condition as better now. Obert Mpofu. Ndlovu, the Minister of Mines and Mining Development, was very happy to see him well and congratulated him for the same.

He said that his family is actually worth laud as it had remained patient and strong till the time he recovered. His elder brother Madinda was relaxed to him home as well. “We are happy as a family. As you can see he is on crutches and no longer on the wheelchair. He was discharged from the hospital a few hours ago”, smiling Madinda was quoted as saying.

Peter, as per the findings, had met a car accident almost two weeks earlier. It was fatal, though Peter faced the serious injuries strongly and sustained the same. 

Meanwhile, Madinda was asked if they would take Peter for further cure to the US and it came out that they are unsure about it as yet.


Latest News

Third-Quarter Sales Better -Than- Expected for LinkedIn, Thanks to New Businesse
“Overweight” Rating for Facebook from JPMorgan Chase & Co
Fall in Oil prices Leave the Small-cap Shale Companies in Trouble
Beginning of 2015, Starbucks will Start its Delivery Service in Selected Markets
Herb Strather, Detroit blight Buyer Makes a Wednesday Deadline
Baidu with its Growing Mobile Presence, Hit 27 Percent Profit Increase
Third Quarter Profits for Samsung Electronics Drop Sharply
Federal Reserve Ends Bond Buying Programme, Keeps Interest Rates Low
Reduced Growth in Major Overseas Economies Affect U.S. Durable Goods Order
Lowe’s to Introduce Robots in Store for Customer Service
Facebook Shares Fall as the Company Portrays Increased in Expenses in 2015
USPS Audit Questions the Consistency of Surveillance Conducted on Mail